Recruitment vaccines – what? how? Why?

Among the other things that are done on the day of enlistment there is also the station of vaccinations.

The questions are many of course.

What vaccines? To whom? Why? Who does not have to do them? And what to expect in terms of side effects?

But no less important and interesting, what can be done differently or better?

All this in the next episode.

A soldier

Diphtheria and tetanus vaccine:

Reminds of the relevant vaccination routine of the children in the State of Israel. ( You can also see the link ).

Ages 2 months, 4 months, 6 months and a year – pentagonal vaccine that includes diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hemophilus influenzae type B and polio.

Second grade – square vaccine – that is, less than one pentagon (hemophilus).

Eighth grade – triple vaccine – that is, the square less one more (polio).

What are all the vaccinations the conscripts get in the army? Impulse dose of tetanus and diphtheria only. Without Pertussis vaccine.

But in recent years we are seeing an increase in the incidence of whooping cough, especially in people older than 18 years. About which we talked about in several places also on this site (for those who want to expand reading, In the following link ). Since the current cough vaccine is a vaccine that has been put to use because of a high rate of side effects to the old vaccine, and since it is a less immunogenic vaccine than the old vaccine, we see people who have been coughing 3-4 years after the previous vaccine.

Now, if the children were vaccinated only in the eighth grade and continue in the army at least until the age of 20-21, then a pertussis infection is something that is asked to happen during military service.

Therefore, if the Whooping cough were also added to the dose of tetanus and diphtheria in recruitment, the soldiers would enjoy a period of compulsory service in which the chances of having Whooping cough patients are lower.

What is the price of each case of whooping cough to the army? Both about the unpleasant disease and about the infection of others? Is the price higher or lower than the difference in the price of the vaccine (with and without whooping cough)? After all, this is a difference in the level of the individual tens of shekels. In my opinion, it could have been more correct if someone who makes decisions at the army had made the right decision and it is an addition of whooping cough within the vaccine given in recruitment.

About the vaccine – a vaccine (no matter the name because there are several names) of the "killed" type, which is given by injection into the arm muscle.

Can be given of course with additional vaccines on the same day.

In terms of common side effects – local sensitivity at the injection site. Remember that the more doses of tetanus vaccine a person receives in their lifetime, the higher the chance of sensitivity and local reaction. I want to say, in my opinion, the next day the recruits know to say in which hand we vaccinated them against tetanus and in which hand other vaccines…

Who should not receive the vaccine? For someone who is known to be hypersensitive to one of the components of the vaccine or who has experienced a significant reaction after a similar previous vaccine.

In conclusion, a vaccine makes sense and is required in an army constellation but could have been maximized by using a vaccine that also contains whooping cough. Theoretically, parents could be sent to receive the vaccine, including whooping cough at the HMO / Ministry of Health level, similar to pregnant women who are vaccinated ( Reading can be extended ), But practically no one will raise this glove budgetary and again, too bad.

Coupling vaccine against meningococcus:

Meningococcus? A violent bacterium that tends to make outbreaks in military institutions. There are 5 main varieties:

Varieties A / C / Y / W-135 and strain B.

The vaccine given to all recruits is a conjugated vaccine against the first four strains. The names are Menactra or Nimenrix.

About the vaccine -an inactivated vaccine, given by injection into the arm muscle.

Can be given of course with additional vaccines on the same day.

In terms of common side effects – local sensitivity at the injection site.

Who should not receive the vaccine? For someone who is known to be hypersensitive to one of the components of the vaccine or who has experienced a significant reaction after a similar previous vaccine.

It is interesting to note that until recently no vaccine was available against meningococcus B and therefore the military vaccinated with what could have been vaccinated. There are currently vaccinations against meningococcus B and the question is whether there is room to add this vaccine in recruitment as well?

These are not cheap vaccines so it is a matter of thought and subtlety. If the military has data on the meningococcal strains that have been infecting soldiers for the past twenty years, it could have been used to decide which vaccine should be given to recruits.

Either way meningococcus tends to make a disease difficult and worthy of all recruits to get this vaccine.

Hepatitis A vaccine (viral hepatitis A):

Routine vaccination given to all Israeli children aged one and a half and two years starting in July 1999 (born in January 1998). Therefore, the vast majority of those who enlist in the IDF received this vaccine as part of their routine vaccinations as children and are considered vaccinated.

A secretary who is considered vaccinated is the one who has a record of receiving two doses of hepatitis A vaccine in the past with a difference of at least half a year between the two doses. A longer time interval between the first and second dose does not cancel out the first dose.

Traditionally the military would give an extra dose, without checking who is properly resilient and who is not properly resilient to combat recruits and kitchen workers.

Since the vast majority of recruits in recent years have already been properly vaccinated without the need for this excess vaccine dose, and after military research examining antibody levels in recruits, the expectation is to abolish a vaccine dose by mid-2021.

What am I saying?

On the one hand, in recent years we have unnecessarily vaccinated many recruits who have already been properly vaccinated against this disease.

On the other hand, now, with the cessation of the routine vaccination in recruitment, those who were not vaccinated in childhood will not be vaccinated. There are many such unfortunately, mainly because these are breastfeeding sessions that many parents tend to postpone (a year and a half and two years).

I think it would have been good if in one of the pre-recruitment sessions, among the many tests that all recruits go through, someone goes through the DIP vaccine booklets and if he finds someone who has not been properly vaccinated for hepatitis A, he will still continue to receive the vaccine.

Recalls that beyond defense during the military period, hepatitis A immunity will also be used by many IDF graduates as adults in the future, certainly and certainly when they fly for a trip around the world.

About the vaccine – a vaccine (no matter the name because there are several names) Inactivated vaccine, given by injection into the arm muscle. Can be given of course with additional vaccines on the same day.

In terms of common side effects – local sensitivity at the injection site.

Who should not receive the vaccine? For someone who is known to be hypersensitive to one of the components of the vaccine or who has experienced a significant reaction after a similar previous vaccine.

In conclusion, vaccination makes sense and is required in the constellation of the military but it is appropriate to fish those people of his vaccination properly and focus only on them. This is instead of vaccinating them all or alternatively none of them.

At the same time, I suggest that the parents of the recruitment candidates open the vaccination booklet on the correct page, make sure that the children have received two doses and if not, go to the HMO before the recruitment and complete the vaccination.

Influenza vaccine (in season):

I have already written about the importance of flu vaccines elsewhere on the site, See link.

During recruitment during the flu season, all soldiers are vaccinated with an Inactivated vaccine by injection.

In my opinion, a vaccine makes sense and is required in the constellation of the army.

In conclusion, the issue of vaccines for recruits is a complex and interesting issue and here too it is possible, at the level of subtleties and with the help of the Ministry of Health / Medical Corps, to bring about a better maximization of the issue for specific soldiers.

the commander!